Road-rail vehicle innovator introduces RailBus

Olifantsfontein-based road-rail vehicle (RRV) manufacturer RailPro has developed a bimodal vehicle that transports people and goods on road and rail, says MD Ed Magan.

The vehicle, called RailBus, was launched in June.

RailPro seeks to address ‘mobility poverty’ in rural and urban areas in emerging markets. He explains that the key variables that define mobility poverty are affordable access to jobs and markets, access to healthcare, education, and food and water.

“In South Africa, many rural communities are isolated, there is increasing car ownership, congestion, poor road development and maintenance, dependence on minibus taxis, high population densities and underused rail.”

He notes that close to the cities, persons living in extreme poverty pay up to 60% of their income for taxi fares, which he calls “an effective mobility tax”. He adds that thousands of rural dwellers are situated close to existing rail lines.

Further, he comments that high-tariff road taxi routes often run adjacent to empty rail lines in the same areas. The RailBus will allow for exploitation of underused rail routes, offering lower tariffs and vastly improving transit time and predictability, and reduce road congestion, he enthuses.

There are about 9 000 km of largely unused branch lines in the country, which are all narrow Cape gauge width; of these, 4 000 km of track is in usable condition, suitable for the RailBus, he advances.

“While some of these lines are not in optimum condition for conventional railway locomotives and carriages, the RailBus is a light vehicle, with a robust suspension system, designed and well-suited to adapting to varying conditions, both on and off rail.”

RailPro developed a patented direct-drive technology that allows a truck to drive on rail, exactly as it does on road. The company uses normal trucks which are retrofitted with a retractable rail undercarriage, which comprises a retractable set of axles and steel rail wheels.

The rail gear is hydraulically activated and the wheels are lowered onto the rail in seconds – the rail axles are powered with RailPro’s direct-drive system, which recently won the South African Bureau of Standards Design Excellence Awards. Magan explains that the truck’s own engine delivers the drive to the rear rail wheels and he enthuses that the vehicle uses less than 50% of the diesel for every kilometre travelled on rail than when on the road.

Moreover, capital and operational costs of the RailBus are significantly cheaper than conventional rolling stock. He points out that conventional carriages hauled by a diesel locomotive cost about R20-million and says the RailBus should be more than ten times cheaper.

Magan further notes that, of crucial importance is the fact that financial institutions are comfortable financing fleets of trucks.

Further, he advances that truck dealerships are already in situ as frontline support and the RRVs can be assembled and maintained in local workshops. “No specialists or specialist parts are needed, and when you remove the rail gear, the vehicle can be sold back into the road market,” he highlights.

The RailBus has attracted significant international interest but Magan is adamant that the RailBus, as an innovative product of a South African company, should be manufactured in South Africa.

“We are trying to create South African jobs and ultimately be able to export RailBus internationally, thereby creating valuable export revenue for the country.”

Five RailBuses will be developed and trials will be carried out on a 21-km route between Cullinan and Mamelodi through Rayton. The company is in discussions with potential local partners as well as banks to procure the capital to build the first fleet and the company is also “talking extensively” with State-owned freight utility Transnet. Magan says as soon as the company procures finances, it will take three months from the moment the chassis arrive to the moment the vehicles will roll out of the factory.

The RailBus will also use electronic design engineers Inteletrack’s traffic management technology. The technology is a dual Global System for Mobile communications/Iridium traffic management system relayed to smart phones.

Inteletrack MD Manie Bernard notes that, when the RailBus is running on the railway lines, railway signalling will be needed to authorise the vehicle to drive on the line. He explains that Inteletrack will install a WiFi hotspot in the vehicle, which will connect to the satellite and a smartphone will display where the vehicle is, where it is authorised to move, as well as the speed limit.

The system works with an application that Inteletrack developed. Further, Inteletrack’s technology will also monitor the vehicle when it travels on the road, Bernard adds. Additional data will be collected and monitored through a regular telematics system to monitor the critical parameters of the RailBus, such as whether the rail wheels are up or down, the fuel level, and oil and water temperatures.

Inteletrack’s traffic management technology harnesses satellite and communications technologies, Magan notes, adding that the only way RailPro can develop a ubiquitous passenger service on rail is through new and modern communication systems.

He hopes that, in the future, individual metros or local government responsible for urban passenger transport, will look at adopting the RailBus to supplement their current public transport offerings.

South African Road-Rail Bus Launched

SOUTH AFRICA: Gauteng-based manufacturer RailPro is testing a road-rail vehicle intended for passenger transport on a railway line east of Pretoria.

State-owned transport group Transnet is working with RailPro on the trials, which are being carried out on a 21 km route between Cullinan and Mamelodi via Rayton. Five RailBus vehicles are being used for the proof of concept, ahead of a more detailed feasibility study.

The RailBus is built on the chassis of an Isuzu 8 tonne lorry. It has retractable wheels so that it can run on rail, in addition to rubber-tyred wheels for road use. Isuzu has expressed interest in producing the vehicle at its South African plant, and Tata and Volvo subsidiary UD Trucks have issued standard warranties for RailPro’s designs.

The prototypes have been developed with the aid of a grant from the SAB Foundation. RailPro envisages that future costs could be met through social impact funding or crowdfunding.

RailPro CEO Ed Magan believes that the RailBus would be suitable for many South African railway branch lines, where heavier locomotive-hauled stock is expensive or difficult to operate. He points out that 4 000 route-km of the 9 000 km of largely unused 1 067 mm branch lines are still in usable condition.

The company envisages both rural and urban applications, and hopes eventually to win export orders. It says that the vehicle can run for up to 6 km per litre of diesel when on rail, leading to fuel cost savings of up to 50% compared with a conventional diesel bus.

Once the RailBus concept has been tested, RailPro intends to test a RailFreighter, which would offer a similar concept designed for farmers bringing produce to market.

http://www.railwaygazette.com/news/news/africa/single-view/view/south-african-road-rail-bus-launched.html

SA-designed ‘RailBus’ could revolutionise passenger and freight transport

RailPro has developed a ‘bi-modal vehicle’ that transports people and goods on road and rail, with fuel consumption and maintenance costs ‘vastly cheaper’ than road vehicles or locomotives.

A Gauteng manufacturer of combined road and rail vehicles is proposing a solution to the public transport problems experienced by poor people in rural and peri-urban areas.

In SA, the onset of large cities growing into each other, or conurbation, has led to poor communities spending long times on travel and disproportionate amounts of money on essential travel. The effect this has on the economy is underscored in a new World Bank report, which cites limited or expensive transport connectivity as a contributory factor to poverty and inequality.

The company, RailPro, has developed what it calls a bi-modal vehicle that transports people and goods on road and rail. It has named the vehicle RailBus. Its salient feature is a South African-invented drive system fitted to an ordinary road-going, diesel-powered lorry (typically eight tonnes), which powers retractable rail wheels when needed.

RailPro envisages the deployment of its RailBus on about 4,000km of SA’s 9,000km of largely unused branch lines to service communities that arose along the country’s railways. The vehicle would also travel on main lines, where necessary.

CEO Ed Magan told a presentation to the media on Thursday that the RailBus’s fuel consumption can be as low as half that of a similar road vehicle due to the low friction of steel wheels on steel rails.

Even greater savings could be achieved when the RailBus is preferred over conventional passenger trains. Magan said the RailBus was a "vastly cheaper" means of transport than rail, with maintenance costs a fraction of those required for a locomotive, while consuming "more than 30 times less" fuel per kilometre than a locomotive pulling passenger wagons.

Magan said the RailBus could mount and dismount railway lines almost anywhere, but typically at level crossings. Creating a halt for the RailBus can be done at negligible cost. "[It] means commuters can board the bus at a conventional bus terminus before mounting the rails and driving more directly to its destination."

RailPro said it would initially market its RailBus to local and provincial governments. Magan was unable to precisely quantify the number of potential passengers or the capacity of the market, referring instead to anecdotal evidence that large numbers of rural South Africans have little or no access to transport.

Transnet’s head of branch lines Jan-Louis Spoelstra said regulatory approval for the RailBus deployment was under way, pending the Rail Safety Regulator’s assessment, and a ruling was only months away.

A railway consultant, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said using branch lines would contribute greatly to community development. "If the community relied on the railway tracks for passenger, and possibly freight transport of agricultural produce to market, they would most likely take ownership of the line and prevent it from being vandalised."

Source:  https://www.businesslive.co.za/bd/national/2018-06-14-sa-designed-railbus-could-revolutionise-passenger-and-freight-transport/

RAILPRO PRESS RELEASE – THE RAILBUS

Get On The RailBus

A new option for transporting South Africa’s commuters who might pay up to 60% of their salaries commuting to work is fast becoming a reality with the introduction of RailPro’s RailBus which was launched this week. The Road Rail Vehicle (RRV) bus can transport people on rail or road at up to half the cost in fuel terms than a conventional diesel bus.

The secret to its economy lies in RailPro’s patented direct drive system which recently won the SABS design excellence award. Designed by South African engineers, the drive system has an extended drive shaft which powers the retractable rail wheels from the bus’s own engine, allowing up to 6km per litre of diesel when on rail.  This saving, due to less friction of steel rail wheels on steel rails, can ideally be passed onto the consumer thereby reducing mobility poverty. RailBus offers a significant saving on fuel compared to a road bus, and a massive saving compared to a locomotive.

Professor Antonio Estache, Professor of Economics at the Universite Libre de Bruxelles, and author of “Infrastructure and the Poor in Sub-Saharan Africa”, has called RailPro’s invention a “technically and socially smart idea.”

The launch of the project comes hot on the heels of a new report published by the World Bank that cites five “binding constraints” or causes of poverty and inequality - including limited or expensive connectivity and under-serviced historically disadvantaged settlements.  The report concluded that “strengthening transport connectivity, integrating transport planning and land use, improving intermodal transport, … are important to overcome the legacy of spatial exclusion, and reduce transportation costs and travel time for the poor.”

CEO of RailPro, Ed Magan, says the grant that RailPro won along with a prestigious innovation award from the SAB Foundation, was being used to convert buses into cheap and convenient transport, primarily for rural people.  He has his eyes on thousands of kilometres of virtually disused railway branch lines that were previously used to transport goods and people in rural areas to the main commercial centres.

Magan says, “There are roughly 9,000 kilometres of largely unused branch lines in South Africa, which are all narrow Cape gauge width. Of these, 4,000 km of track is in usable condition, suitable for the RailBus.

“These largely underutilised rail lines would allow for easier and safer transportation of rural commuters, including school children from their villages to the local towns and commercial centres.  Such a facility could also assist rural farmers to get their products to market faster and in a cost-effective manner”, Magan said.

“While some of these lines are not in optimum condition for conventional railway engines and carriages, the RailBus is a light vehicle, with a robust suspension system, designed and well suited to adapting to varying conditions, both on and off rail”, he said.

Magan is firm in his belief that the RailBus makes economic sense. Conventional carriages hauled by a diesel locomotive costs in the region of at least R20m. The RailBus is built on a normal 8-tonne truck, vastly cheaper, with maintenance costs a fraction of those required for a locomotive, whilst consuming over 30 times less fuel per kilometre than a locomotive pulling passenger wagons. And of crucial importance is the fact that financial institutions are comfortable financing fleets of trucks.

“The fact that the RailBus can mount and dismount the railway tracks means that commuters can board the bus at a conventional bus terminus before mounting the rails and driving more directly to its destination”, he said.

Magan is, however, hoping that in the future, individual metros or local government, responsible for urban passenger transport, will look at adopting the RailBus to supplement their current public transport offerings.

The RailBus has attracted a lot of international interest, but Magan is adamant that the RailBus is the innovative product of a South African company and should be manufactured in South Africa.  “We are trying to create South African jobs and ultimately be able to export Railbus internationally, thereby creating valuable export revenue for the country”, said Magan.

With a clear line of sight of demand, a global automotive company would like to manufacture the RailBus at their South African plant and support the venture through their distribution network already in place across the SADC region.

In 2017 the Department of Transport (DOT) commissioned Ernst and Young to carry out a strategic review of the socio- economic-impact of branch lines.  Published last year, the DOT is reportedly fully aware of where the RailBus can be deployed, highlighting five critically important branch lines, that with conventional locomotive offerings made passenger transport unaffordable.

Additionally, a draft white paper published last year by the Department of Transport says that urban commuters are increasingly challenged by road congestion and safety issues and that these, plus long travel times, negatively impacts on economic growth and commuter’s quality of life.

An independent railway consultant said this week that using the branch line network was “really worthwhile” as it would contribute vastly to community development. “If the community relied on the railway tracks for passenger and possibly freight transport of their agricultural produce to market, they would most likely take ownership of the line and prevent it being vandalised”.

The RailBus will be operated using accepted safety mechanisms such as existing traffic control systems on the rail line, speed limitation, proximity radar and telematic controls. With the advent of “internet of things” technologies, these systems are advancing rapidly, and Magan cited another world-leading technology out of South Africa, Inteletrack, who have developed a dual GSM/Iridium traffic management system relayed to smart-phones that is already successfully implemented in Zimbabwe and Zambia.

Source: http://www.railwaysafrica.com/news/get-on-the-railbus

Railpro has received their first order for the eagerly anticipated Scissor Lift RRV...

RailPro delivers further Crane RRV to Tractionel Enterprise...

RailPro has secured two further orders for the new Crane RRV (CRRV)

Following the launch of the RailPro 20 tonne crane RRV, and its placement with Tractionel Enterprise, RailPro has received a further two orders for Crane RRVs. The enhanced lifting capability with direct access to track and the significant increase in productivity that the vehicle offers is being well received in the market.

December 2016: Engineering News Publication...

RailPro has secured two further orders for the new Crane RRV (CRRV)

Following the launch of the RailPro 20 tonne crane RRV, and its placement with Tractionel Enterprises, RailPro has received a further two orders for Crane RRVs. The enhanced lifting capability with direct access to track and the significant increase in productivity that the vehicle offers is being well received in the market.

December 2016: RailPro in Railways Africa...

 

Acabado de lançar.... artigo RailPro na publicação “Railways Africa”!

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Veículo  Rodo-Ferroviário Sul Africano Inovador

“A habilidade da “RailPro” em produzir um veículo que pode ser facilmente e rápidamente adaptado de padrão a bitola estreita é uma virada de jogo para nós, que nos permite atender a uma base de clientes mais ampla ".

Juan Swart, Gerente de Operações, Tractionel Enterprise

Desde que foi introduzido o conceito de melhorar a entrega de serviços de manutenção e equipes utilizando veículos de vias públicas, a tecnologia que permite que estes veículos bi-modal sejam equipados para transporte ferroviário com rodas retrátil  de engrenagem tem evoluído constantemente.

Veículos Rodo Ferroviários (VRFs) “RRVs” são agora uma familiar, se não peculiar, visão sobre ferrovias Africanas. Tentativas indiferentes para estimular o interesse na prestação de serviços intermodais pelos VRFs  (RRVs) surgiram aqui e ali, na África do Sul, mas não conseguiram decolar.  O actual projetista Sul-Africano do VRF, RailPro, persegue activamente este potencial.  Foram pioneiros de uma técnica pelo qual camiões rodoviários, equipados com sua tecnologia proprietária são habilitados a transmitir energia para as rodas ferroviárias diretamente do motor do camião, o que a RailPro argumenta ser diferente de qualquer outra técnica no mercado actual.  "Ser simples de manter,  leve, e cerca de 30 vezes mais eficiente no combustível do que uma pequena locomotiva, é o que faz com que esses camiões sejam uma locomotiva bi-modal eficaz," diz RailPro.

Conhecida por DSDS, a equipe do projeto recebeu um prêmio de excelência de Design SABS pela sua invenção.  O sistema é montado no chassi de um camião existente, precisando apenas de  pequenas modificações. Um número de derivados do VRF (RRV) foram desenvolvidos. Notavelmente, os veículos destinados à manutenção ferroviária, incluindo uma variante do Equipamento de Ponte Deslizante de desenho próprio (Overhead Track Equipment (OHTE) "cherry picker", que a RailPro acredita ser único. É  desenhado em conformidade com uma infinidade de segurança específica ferroviária e regulamentos da carga dos eixos.

Rob Allen, que anteriormente geria a frota de aluguer ferria  da Imperial Fleet Management  juntou-se recentemente à nossa equipe.  Allen diz, "a oferta RailPro é adequada a todos os calibres e para uso em toda a África. Nossa linha de produtos oferece aos proprietários e empreiteiros ferroviários uma plataforma rápida e eficiente para a inspeção ferroviário essencial, entrega de tripulação e manutenção. "

Um "RailBus" bi-modal foi desenhado para transportar os trabalhadores aos locais ferroviários de manutenção.  RailPro, que detém a tecnologia DSDS, explica que tem apoio de investidores internacionais e visa atingir uma estrutura com credenciais de empoderamento econômico de locais (BEE) para operações na África do Sul.  A empresa está confiante de que novos conceitos intermodais são viáveis em toda a África, onde os desafios do dia-a-dia com respeito à utilização de vias ferrias efectivamente podem ser superados com um pouco de pensamento pragmático e inovador.

Estou animado com as oportunidades intermodais,"acrescentou Allen,"não só o nosso produto RailBus para conectar comunidades remotas, mas também adaptar a nossa oferta existente  ao transporte de mercadorias.  Acreditamos que isto tem excelentes perspectivas aqui e no exterior.  Estou ansioso para supervisionar o aumento das vendas do nosso produto em excitantes novos mercados."

RailPro está atualmente em conversações com vários parceiros fora da África do Sul para iniciar testes autônomos dos VRFs (RRV), que utiliza a tecnologia inovadora de linha ferria modular sem lastro e o sistema de controlo de entremeado Bombardier (Bombardier’s interflo control system).

Cerca de 21 VRFs utilizando o sistema DSDS estão actualmente operacionais por toda a África do Sul. Recentemente, especializados em infraestrutura elétrica, a Tractionel Enterprise comprou o Equipamento de Ponte deslizante VRF (Overhead Track Equipament (OHTE)) para empreender trabalho de reparação e manutenção.

O Gerente de operações do Tractionel, Juan Swart explica que um fator- chave em optar pelo veículo RailPro equipado com o sistema DSDS foi a eliminação de caros componentes de engrenagem ferroviário importados e muitas vezes problemáticos.

“É reconfortante ter suporte técnico local e designers locais experientes que entendem as necessidades  que temos tanto abaixo como por cima do chassi", disse Swart.

"por exemplo", acrescentou, "a capacidade do RailPro para produzir um veículo que pode ser facilmente e rapidamente adaptado de padrão a bitola estreita é uma virada de jogo para nós, que nos permite atender a uma base de clientes mais ampla."

“Acredito que há um potencial enorme para estes VRFs (RRVs)com o sistema DSDS no mercado Africano mais amplo", concluiu Swart.

17 de Março de 2016 – Em Abril 2016 a RailPro demonstra o VRF Perway em Brits...

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February 2016: RailPro Carry out Demonstration at Heidelberg TFR Depot...

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Fevereiro 2016: Rob Allen junta-se à RailPro...

Rob Allen, que anteriormente geria a frota ferria de aluguer da Imperial Fleet Management  juntou-se recentemente à nossa equipe.  Allen diz, "a oferta RailPro é adequada a todas as bitolas e para uso em toda a África. Nossa linha de produtos oferece aos proprietários e empreiteiros ferroviários uma plataforma rápida e eficiente para a inspeção ferroviário essencial, entrega de tripulação e manutenção." Estou também animado com as oportunidades intermodais," não só o nosso produto RailBus para conectar comunidades remotas, mas também adaptar a nossa oferta existente  ao transporte de mercadorias.  Acreditamos que isto tem excelentes perspectivas aqui e no exterior.  Estou ansioso para supervisionar o aumento das vendas do nosso produto em novos mercados excitantes."

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Janeiro 2016: Tractionel Enterprises adquire o primeiro RailPro VRF OHTE

Tractionel Enterprises adquiriu seu primeiro VRF (RRV) RailPro OHTE. O Gerente de Operações do Tractionel, Juan Swart explica que um fator-chave em optar pelo veículo Railpro equipado com o sistema DSDS™ foi a eliminação de caros componentes de engrenagem ferroviário importados e muitas vezes problemáticos.

É reconfortante ter suporte técnico local e designers locais experientes que entendem as necessidades  que temos tanto abaixo como por cima do chassi", disse Juan. "Por exemplo, a capacidade do RailPro para produzir um veículo que pode ser facilmente e rapidamente adaptado de padrão a bitola estreita é uma virada de jogo para nós, que nos permite atender a uma base de clientes mais ampla. Acredito que há um potencial enorme para estes VRFs com o sistema DSDS no mercado Africano mais amplo."

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Janeiro 2016: Publicação de notícias de Engenharia...

O projetista Sul Africano do veículo rodo-ferroviário (VRF “RRV”), RailPro, persegue uma solução de um veículo-semi-autônomo, que acredita poderia abrir novas oportunidades de mercado para seus veículos, que estão atualmente empregados principalmente em operações de manutenção e reparação.
A empresa foi pioneira em uma solução que permite aos camiões equipados com seu trem de pouso retrátil das rodas ferroviárias, a transmissão de energia para as rodas através da caixa de velocidades existente no veículo.

O sistema, conhecido por DSDS, foi patenteado e reconhecido em 2009 com um Prêmio de Excelência de Design SABS. Pode ser montado no chassi existente do camião com apenas pequenas modificações pelo fabricante original do equipamento e tem, até à data, sido montado em vários camiões grandes e pequenos disponíveis no mercado Sul Africano.

O Director Executivo Ian Ross disse ao Engineering News Online que vários derivativos do VRF (RRV) têm desde então sido desenvolvidos, incluindo um veículo de construção de leito usado para manter a via permanente, veículos equipados com uma plataforma elevatória móvel de trabalho para a manutenção de equipamento de ponte deslizante (overhead track equipment), um camião-tanque, um modelo da soldadura VRF “RRV”, bem como veículos para inspecção e um RailBus para transportar trabalhadores aos locais de manutenção.

Cerca de 21 VRFs utilizando o sistema DSDS estão actualmente operacionais por toda a África do Sul, mas Ross admite que essa absorção tem sido abaixo das expectativas. RailPro, que detém a tecnologia DSDS, é apoiado por investidores internacionais e pretende concluir uma estrutura accionista com um forte perfil de empoderamento econômico local, para operações na África do Sul.

O foco em África continua a ser o mercado de reparação e manutenção, que, na África do Sul, é dominado pelas grandes empresas estatais (SoCs), Transnet e Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa. A empresa também está interessada em vender para as organizações de reparação e manutenção que prestam serviços a estes SoCs, tendo vendido recentemente um equipamento de ponte deslizante VRF “RRV” (overhead track equipment) aos especialistas de infra-estrutura elétrica, Tractionel Enterprise que utilizará o veículo extensivamente para a construção, remodelação e manutenção de equipamentos de ponte deslizante (overhead track equipment).

Gerente de operações do Tractionel Juan Swart explica que a principal vantagem da eliminação do veículo Railpro são os caros componentes importados de engrenagem ferroviário...
RailPro também começa a perseguir perspectivas internacionais, Ross vendo uma margem significativa para os VRFs “RRVs” leves, de baixo consumo de combustivél e semi-autónomo nos segmentos do mercado de transporte de mercadorias e passageiros
A empresa, que tem instalações de fabrico e montagem em Olifantsfontein, Gauteng, está em conversações com vários parceiros fora da África do Sul para iniciar testes autónomos do VRF “RRV”, usando a tecnologia inovadora de vias ferrias tubular sem lastros e o sistema de controle de entremeado Bombardier (Bombardier’s Interflo control system).

Ross disse que a solução intermodal poderia oferecer aos transportadores de mercadorias, a opção de usar camiões VRF “RRV” perfeitamente através de redes ferroviárias e rodoviárias a fim de diminuir os custos operacionais. Da mesma forma, os VRFs “RRVs” equipados com carruagens autorizados e aprovados pelas autoridades rodoviárias e de transporte poderiam operar em certas rotas ferroviárias para passageiros na vez de conjuntos de comboios caros que são mais adequados para rotas de cargas mais volumosas.

Principalmente aplicável em áreas urbanas, Ross argumenta que um sistema composto por uma linha ferria modular, tecnologia de unidade autónoma e RailPro Railbuses podem ser uma solução eficiente e prática para endereçar a 'pobreza de mobilidade» em cidades africanas.
"Precisamos ainda de sair dos blocos de partida no que respeita esta oferta, mas estamos perto de concluir as parcerias necessárias para começar a comercializar o que vemos como a próxima geração de VRFs “RRVs," conclui Ross.

Maio 2015: RailPro Perway...

Bidvest tem 19 VRFs  DSDS Perway com base-Tata em movimento em Bellville, Cidade do Cabo. Esta foto foi tirada durante um curso de formação de re-familiarização executado pelo DSDS para a Transnet Freight Railway, em Maio de 2015. Estas unidades estão em serviço à três anos (Propriedade da Bidvest, na FML a TFR).